Featured Image

Health Sciences Chemistry

Chemistry/Health Sciences

Program Description

Health Sciences offers a rewarding career in healthcare and related fields. If you plan to go on to health professional school, you’ll need a bachelor’s degree and a set of prerequisite courses, so it makes sense to choose a concentration within your major in which you are interested, and one that contains as many of the prerequisite courses as possible. Most of the prerequisite courses come from Chemistry, Physics, and Mathematics, the courses needed for the Chemistry major. So, you will be earning your degree at the same time you are meeting the requirements for professional school.          

For Points of Pride and Soaring Warhawks, see the Chemistry page.

Put Your Degree to Work

Note: While salaries vary depending on several factors including your level of experience, education and training, and geography and industry, here is a sampling of the future job growth and salaries in this area.

Employment of healthcare occupations is projected to grow 19 percent from 2014 to 2024, much faster than the average for all occupations, adding about 2.3 million new jobs. Healthcare occupations will add more jobs than any other group of occupations. This growth is expected due to an aging population and because federal health insurance reform should increase the number of individuals who have access to health insurance. The median annual wage for healthcare practitioners and technical occupations (such as registered nurses, physicians and surgeons, and dental hygienists) was $61,710 in May 2014, which was higher than the median annual wage for all occupations in the economy of $35,540. Healthcare support occupations (such as home health aides, occupational therapy assistants, and medical transcriptionists) had a median annual wage of $26,440 in May 2014, lower than the median annual wage for all occupations in the economy.


U.S Bureau of Labor Statistics sample

Jobs

Median Pay

Job Growth through 2024

Dietitians and Nutritionists

$56,950 per year

16% (11,000 more jobs)

Registered Nurses

$66,640 per year

16% (439,300 more jobs)

Health Educators and Community Health Workers

$42,450 per year

13% (15,600 more jobs

For More Information

Chemistry Department

Auburn University at Montgomery

Goodwyn Hall 310K

334-244-3315
sarnold@aum.edu

Program Overview

The course listings below are a representation of what this academic program requires. For a full review of this program in detail, please see our official online catalog AND consult with an academic advisor. This listing does not include the core curriculum courses required for all majors and may not include some program-specific information, such as admissions, retention and termination standards.

Course sampling specific to the Health Sciences: Chemistry concentration includes:


Course #

Course Name

Course Description

BIOL 2100/2101

Human Anatomy & Physiology I/Lab

A study of the structure and function of the tissues, and integumentary, skeletal, articular, muscular, nervous, and sensory systems.

BIOL 2110/2111

Human Anatomy & Physiology II/Lab

A study of the structure and function of the cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, endocrine, and reproductive systems.

CHEM 1100/1101

General Chemistry I/Lab CHM

A detailed study of atomic theory, chemical bonding, states of matter, solutions and acid-base theory.

CHEM 1200/1201

General Chemistry II/Lab

A detailed study of kinetics, equilibria and thermodynamics. Introductions to organic chemistry and nuclear chemistry included.

PHYS 2100/2101

General Physics I/Lab

A treatment of statics, mechanics, heat and thermodynamics intended for technical majors. Calculus-based procedures employed frequently.

PHYS 2200/2201

General Physics II/Lab

A treatment of electricity, magnetism, wave phenomena, sound and optics intended for technical majors. Calculus-based procedures employed frequently.

BIOL 2100/2101

Human Anatomy & Physiology I/Lab

A study of the structure and function of the tissues, and integumentary, skeletal, articular, muscular, nervous, and sensory systems.